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Pharmacogenetic Testing

Clinically Actionable Pharmacogenetic Tests to Determine Right Medication and Dosage

Pharmacogenetic Testing allows us to assess the likelihood that an individual will have normal, reduced or enhanced response to certain medications. This is very important because it dictates how a person responds to a treatment prior to actually receiving the treatment based on genetics, improving efficacy and reducing adverse effects.

Actionable Pharmacogenetic Biomarkers Identify Genetic Fingerprints to Help Determine the Tailored Treatment Plan

ABCB1
APOE
COMT
CYP2C19
CYP2C9
CYP2D6
CYP1A2
CYP2B6
CYP3A4
CYP3A5
DRD2
Factor II
Factor V
MTHFR
OPRM1
SLCO1B1
VKORC1
ApoE
CYP2C9
CYP2D6
CYP3A4
CYP3A5
CYP1A2
ABCB1
CYP2B6
CYP2C19
SLCO1B1
VKORC1
Factor II
Factor V
MTHFR
CYP2B6
DRD2
CYP1A2
OPRM1
CYP2D6
CYP3A4
COMT
CYP2C19
CYP3A5
CYP2C9
CYP2C19
CYP3A4
CYP2C9
CYP1A2
CYP2D6
CYP3A5
OPRM1
COMT
CYP2C19
CYP3A5
CYP2C9
CYP2D6
MTHFR
Factor II
Factor V
VKORC1
Factor II
Factor V
MTHFR

Tests can be ordered as a panel, or individually. Customized report with personalized results.

Adverse drug reaction (ADR) is the number four leading cause of death, with cardiac disease the first, cancer the second, and accidents as the third. It is estimated that about 2.2 million hospitalized patients suffer from ADR, resulting in 106,000 annual deaths. One of the causes for ADR is failed drug metabolism that could result in inactive products, leading to therapy failure or toxic metabolites that linger in the body for a longer time, which then lead to adverse side effects.
Pharmacogenetic Testing is shown to provide tailored information for the right medication for a person based on their genetic makeup and to enhance drug efficacy. It allows us to assess the likelihood that an individual will have a normal, reduced, or enhanced response to certain medications. This is very important because it dictates how a person responds to a treatment prior to actually receiving the treatment based on their genetics, improving efficacy and reducing adverse effects

Medical Management

Comprehensive Drug Metabolism Panel

This test may aid in drug selection and dose planning for drugs metabolized by genes in our comprehensive Medical Management Panel: opioid analgesics (buprenorphine, fentanyl, hydrocodone, meperidine, methadone), other common drugs (clonazepam, statins), plavix, warfarin (coumadin), antidepressants, antipsychotic medications, antimalarials, clopidogrel, diazepam, phenytoin, proton pump inhibitors, tamoxifen, beta blockers, anti-arrhythmic, morphine derivatives, xenobiotics, anti-cancer drugs cyclophosphamide and ifosphamide, NNRTI, opiate replacement therapy, anesthetic, protein kinase inhibitor, SERM, catecholamine neurotransmitters dopamine, epinephrine, and norepinephrine. It also detects gene variants that affect pain threshold, presence of pain-related disorders (fibromyalgia, TMJ syndrome, migraine), in addition to variants associated with inherited thrombosis.
ABCB1
APOE
COMT
CYP2C19
CYP2C9
CYP2D6
CYP1A2
CYP2B6
CYP3A4
CYP3A5
DRD2
Factor II
Factor V
MTHFR
OPRM1
SLCO1B1
VKORC1

Cardiac

And Blood Clot Panel

This test targets the genotyping of 11 genes that are known to affect the metabolism of medications that treat cardiovascular disease and may aid in drug selection and dose planning for drugs metabolized by genes in the Cardiac Panel, including gene variants that affect Beta Blockers, Antiplatelets, Anticoagulants, Statins, Antiarrhythmics, and others.

This panel also checks for the risk of thrombosis based on genotyping of common variants in three genes: Factor II, Factor V, and Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR). The presence of inherited thrombophilia does not affect anticoagulant therapy since the mutations tested for are not known to be resistant to therapy; however, they may recommend the prolonged use of anticoagulants during therapy, especially for patients that would alternatively stop the medication without this added knowledge.

ApoE
CYP2C9
CYP2D6
CYP3A4
CYP3A5
CYP1A2
ABCB1
CYP2B6
CYP2C19
SLCO1B1
VKORC1
Factor II
Factor V
MTHFR

Phychiatry and Addiction

Drug Metabolism Panel

This test targets the genotyping of 10 genes that are known to affect the metabolism of medications prescribed for psychiatric disorders and addiction drugs. It may help to understand why patients respond differently to drugs used in psychiatry and predict risk for psychiatric disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases and substance abuse. The panel aids in drug selection and dose planning for Antiaddictives, Anti-ADHD Agents, Anticonvulsants, Antidementia Agents, Antidepressants, Antipsychotics, Benzodiazepines, and other neurological agents.
CYP2B6
DRD2
CYP1A2
OPRM1
CYP2D6
CYP3A4
COMT
CYP2C19
CYP3A5
CYP2C9

Pain Medication

Metabolism Panel

This test targets the genotyping of 8 genes that are known to affect the metabolism of medications that treat pain and may aid in drug selection and dose planning for drugs metabolized by genes in the Pain Management Panel, including gene variants that affect pain threshold, presence of pain-related disorders (fibromyalgia, TMJ syndrome, migraine), and others. Medications covered under this panel include muscle relaxants, NSAIDs, opioids, and fibromyalgia agents.
CYP2C19
CYP3A4
CYP2C9
CYP1A2
CYP2D6
CYP3A5
OPRM1
COMT

Acid Reflux and Antiemetics

Drug Metabolism Panel

This test targets the genotyping of 6 genes that are known to affect the metabolism of medications that treat gastrointestinal disorders and may aid in drug selection and dose planning for drugs metabolized by genes in this panel, specifically gene variants that affect antiemetics and proton pump inhibitors.
CYP3A4
CYP1A2
CYP2C19
CYP2D6
CYP2C9
ABCB1

Anti-Seizure Medication

Metabolism Panel

This test targets the genotyping of 4 genes that are known to affect the metabolism of medications prescribed to treat seizures. There is a high variability in an individual’s response to antiepileptic treatment in which genetic variations play a major role. Our panel aids in drug selection and dose planning for anticonvulsants used in the treatment of epileptic seizures and to prevent the spread of the seizure within the brain.
CYP2C19
CYP3A4
CYP3A5
CYP2C9

Warfarin

Metabolism Panel

This test targets the genotyping of 2 genes that are known to affect the metabolism of warfarin, one of the most prescribed blood thinners. One of the drawbacks of warfarin is that it is difficult to administer at the correct dose due to its narrow therapeutic index and its tendency to cause bleeding.

Achieving safe and effective doses of warfarin therapy is both an urgent and important concern for many clinicians and could be guided by the individual variability in patient response due to variants in CYP2C9, which codes for an enzyme that is primarily responsible for the metabolism of warfarin, and VKORC1, which codes for vitamin K epoxide reductase, a target for warfarin drug.

Plavix

Metabolism Panel

This test targets the genotyping of 1 gene that is known to affect the metabolism of Plavix (clopidogrel), a drug taken by about 40 million patients worldwide to prevent atherothrombotic events and cardiac stent thrombosis when given along with aspirin. Plavix is converted to its active form by CYP2C19 and certain variants in the gene produce an inactive enzyme which leads to poor or low metabolism of the drug. Other variants result in a fast-acting enzyme which is associated with rapid metabolism leading to faster clearing of the drug form the body. This test will identify those variants and help understand how Plavix is metabolized, which will lead to dose adjustments when needed and achieving better patient outcome.

If you have any questions about Ayass BioScience, LLC (DBA Ayass Lung Clinic, PLLC – CLIA Certified Laboratory) Pharmacogenetic Testing, please call today at 972-668-6005 or fill out our contact form on the bottom of this page. We will answer any question you might have.