Why is Pharmacogenetic Testing FOR YOU?

Find out if a certain medicine could be effective.
Find out the best dosage.
Predict if you will have a serious side effect.

People can respond differently to the same medications and doses, or experience different side effects, because of the genes we have inherited. Differences in genetic make-up  can explain why a drug that is effective for some may be less effective for others or why a drug that is safe for one person may be less safe for another person—even at the same dosage.

With our personalized testing, prescriptions can be tailored to a particular individual. By analyzing the genes that produce the specific drug targets or enzymes that metabolize a medication or are associated with immune response, a dose can be lowered, a different drug can be prescribed, or drug-drug interactions can be prevented.

Incorporating genetic testing into the drug prescription process can help improve efficacy and reduce adverse effects. Testing can be ordered BEFORE you start a certain medicine, or if you are ALREADY taking a medicine that is NOT WORKING and/or causing bad SIDE EFFECTS.

Actionable Pharmacogenetic Biomarkers Identify Genetic Fingerprints to Help Determine the Tailored Treatment Plan

ABCB1, APOE, COMT, CYP2C19, CYP2C9, CYP2D6, CYP1A2, CYP2B6, CYP3A4, CYP3A5, DRD2, Factor II, Factor V, MTHFR, OPRM1, SLCO1B1, VKORC1

This test may aid in drug selection and dose planning for the following drugs metabolized by genes in our comprehensive Medical Management Panel: opioid analgesics (buprenorphine, fentanyl, hydrocodone, meperidine, methadone), other common drugs (clonazepam, statins), plavix, warfarin (coumadin), antidepressants, antipsychotic medications, antimalarials, clopidogrel, diazepam, phenytoin, proton pump inhibitors, tamoxifen, beta blockers, anti-arrhythmic, morphine derivatives, xenobiotics, anti-cancer drugs cyclophosphamide and ifosphamide, NNRTI, opiate replacement therapy, anesthetic, protein kinase inhibitor, SERM, catecholamine neurotransmitters dopamine, epinephrine, norepinephrine. It also detects gene variants that affect pain threshold, presence of pain-related disorders (fibromyalgia, TMJ syndrome, migraine), in addition to variants associated with inherited thrombosis.

ApoE, CYP2C9, CYP2D6, CYP3A4, CYP3A5, CYP1A2, ABCB1, CYP2B6, CYP2C19, SLCO1B1, VKORC1, Factor II, Factor V, MTHFR

This test targets the genotyping of 11 genes that are known to affect the metabolism of medications that treat cardiovascular disease and may aid in drug selection and dose planning for drugs metabolized by genes in the Cardiac Panel, including gene variants that affect Beta Blockers, Antiplatelets, Anticoagulants, Statins, Antiarrhythmics, and others.
This panel also checks for the risk of thrombosis based on genotyping of common variants in three genes: Factor II, Factor V, and Methylenetetra-
hydrofolate reductase (MTHFR). The presence of inherited thrombophilia does not affect anticoagulant therapy since the mutations tested for are not known to be resistant to therapy; however, they may recommend the prolonged use of anticoagulants during therapy, especially for patients that would alternatively stop the medication without this added knowledge.

CYP2B6, DRD2, CYP1A2, OPRM1, CYP2D6, CYP3A4, COMT, CYP2C19, CYP3A5, CYP2C9

This test targets the genotyping of 10 genes that are known to affect the metabolism of medications prescribed for psychiatric disorders and addiction drugs. It may help to understand why patients respond differently to drugs used in psychiatry and predict risk for psychiatric disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases and substance abuse. The panel aids in drug selection and dose planning for Antiaddictives, Anti-ADHD Agents, Anticonvulsants, Antidementia Agents, Antidepressants, Antipsychotics, Benzodiazepines, and other neurological agents.

CYP2C19, CYP3A4, CYP2C9, CYP1A2, CYP2D6, CYP3A5, OPRM1, COMT

This test targets the genotyping of 8 genes that are known to affect the metabolism of medications that treat pain and may aid in drug selection and dose planning for drugs metabolized by genes in the Pain Management Panel, including gene variants that affect pain threshold, presence of pain-related disorders (fibromyalgia, TMJ syndrome, migraine), and others. Medications covered under this panel include muscle relaxants, NSAIDs, opioids, and fibromyalgia agents.

CYP3A4, CYP1A2, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, CYP2C9, ABCB1

This test targets the genotyping of 6 genes that are known to affect the metabolism of medications that treat gastrointestinal disorders and may aid in drug selection and dose planning for drugs metabolized by genes in this panel, specifically gene variants that affect antiemetics and proton pump inhibitors.

CYP2C19, CYP3A4, CYP3A5, CYP2C9

This test targets the genotyping of 4 genes that are known to affect the metabolism of medications prescribed to treat seizures. There is a high variability in an individual’s response to antiepileptic treatment in which genetic variations play a major role. Our panel aids in drug selection and dose planning for anticonvulsants used in the treatment of epileptic seizures and to prevent the spread of the seizure within the brain.

CYP2C9, VKORC1

This test targets the genotyping of 2 genes that are known to affect the metabolism of warfarin, one of the most prescribed blood thinners. One of the drawbacks of warfarin is that it is difficult to administer at the correct dose due to its narrow therapeutic index and its tendency to cause bleeding. Achieving safe and effective doses of warfarin therapy is both an urgent and important concern for many clinicians and could be guided by the individual variability in patient response due to variants in CYP2C9, which codes for an enzyme that is primarily responsible for the metabolism of warfarin, and VKORC1, which codes for vitamin K epoxide reductase, a target for warfarin drug.

CYP2C19

This test targets the genotyping of 1 gene that is known to affect the metabolism of Plavix (clopidogrel), a drug taken by about 40 million patients worldwide to prevent atherothrombotic events and cardiac stent thrombosis when given along with aspirin. Plavix is converted to its active form by CYP2C19 and certain variants in the gene produce an inactive enzyme which leads to poor or low metabolism of the drug. Other variants result in a fast-acting enzyme which is associated with rapid metabolism leading to faster clearing of the drug form the body. This test will identify those variants and help understand how Plavix is metabolized, which will lead to dose adjustments when needed and achieving better patient outcome.

Tests can be ordered as a panel, or individually. Customized report with personalized results.

Adverse drug reaction (ADR) is the number four leading cause of death, with cardiac disease the first, cancer the second, and accidents as the third. It is estimated that about 2.2 million hospitalized patients suffer from ADR, resulting in 106,000 annual deaths. One of the causes for ADR is failed drug metabolism that could result in inactive products, leading to therapy failure or toxic metabolites that linger in the body for a longer time, which then lead to adverse side effects.

Pharmacogenetics is studying how genes affect the body’s response to certain medicines. Genes are defined by DNA inherited from your parents and they carry information that determines your specific characteristics (height, eye color, blood type, etc.). Your genes can impact how safe and effective a particular drug could be for you. Most drugs are broken down (metabolized) in the body by various enzymes. A drug may become more active, less active or inactive through metabolism.

The challenge in medication therapy management is to determine whether the active form of a drug stays around long enough in the body to achieve the desired effect. Some people may metabolize the medication too fast (drug levels in the blood never become high enough for the drug to be effective) or too slow (causing toxicity.) or not at all. If a drug is not metabolized in the body, it will not produce its intended effect or it may remain in a person’s system too long and may end up causing side effects.

Right now drugs are prescribed at a “standard” dose based on factors such as weight, sex, and age. Dosages and timing of drugs are usually based on the anticipated rate of metabolism and clearance from the body of the average person, which is why the same medication at the same dose will affect people in very different ways.

If you have any questions about Ayass BioScience, LLC (DBA Ayass Lung Clinic, PLLC – CLIA Certified Laboratory) Pharmacogenetic Testing, please call today at 972-668-6005 or fill out our contact form on the bottom of this page. We will answer any question you might have.